The University of Arizona  1993-95 General Catalog

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Renewable Natural Resources
(RNR/L AR/RA M/WS M/WFSC)
Biological Sciences East, Room 325
(520) 621-7255

Professors C. P. Patrick Reid, Director, Hanna J. Cortner, Terry
C. Daniel (Psychology), Peter F. Ffolliott, Martin M. Fogel
(Emeritus), Lloyd W. Gay, Robert L. Gilbertson (Plant Pathology),
Martha W. Gilliland (Civil Engineering and Engineering
Mechanics), Frank Gregg (Emeritus), William L. Halvorson, William
H. Havens, Richard H. Hawkins, Malcolm K. Hughes (Tree-Ring
Laboratory), Robert R. Humphrey (Emeritus), Roy R. Johnson,
Warren D. Jones (Emeritus), David A. King, James O. Klemmedson
(Emeritus), Philip N. Knorr (Emeritus), Paul R. Krausman, O.
Eugene Maughan, Phil R. Ogden, Mitchel P. McClaran, Ervin M.
Schmutz (Emeritus), William W. Shaw, Norman S. Smith, John L.
Thames (Emeritus), Robert F. Wagle (Emeritus), Ervin H. Zube,
Malcolm J. Zwolinski

Associate Professors Mark P. Frederickson, H. Randal Gimblett,
Lauri M. Johnson, Gordon S. Lehman, Donald V. Lightner
(Veterinary Science), R. William Mannan, William J. Matter, Bruce
A. Roundy, E. Lamar Smith, Jerry Tash (Emeritus), Donovan C.
Wilkin

Assistant Professors Lee A. Graham, Lisa J. Graumlich (Tree-Ring
Laboratory), D. Philip Guertin, Vicente L. Lopes, Guy R.
McPherson, Thomas W. Swetnam (Tree-Ring Laboratory)

Lecturer Charles D. Ziebell (Emeritus)

Extension Specialists Donna K. Chickering, George B. Ruyle, John
R. Stair

The School of Renewable Natural Resources is concerned with the
management and conservation of natural ecosystems of arid and
semi-arid environments. Programs of study in the School prepare
students for careers in management with environmental science and
natural resource agencies and organizations that require a
fundamental knowledge about the science, planning and management
of natural systems to provide the resources of water, wood,
forage, wildlife, fisheries, soil and aesthetic values.

The Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources is
available with majors in range management, watershed management
and wildlife and fisheries science. Undergraduate minors are
available in these general areas of study. The degree is composed
of general education and supporting science courses, a series of
interdisciplinary renewable natural resource courses, and courses
that develop additional knowledge in subjects specific to each
major. The natural resource core curriculum is designed to
integrate subjects of importance to all students in renewable
natural resource fields, to introduce students to the
interdisciplinary nature of resource management, and to develop
an understanding of multiple-use management systems. A major in
landscape architecture for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture
and Master of Landscape Architecture are also offered. In
addition, a student may obtain the degree of Master of Science or
Doctor of Philosophy with a major in range management, watershed
management, wildlife and fisheries science, or renewable natural
resources studies. For information concerning graduate admission
and degree requirements, consult the Graduate Catalog.

Renewable Natural Resources (RNR)

135. Conservation of Natural Resources (3) I Conservation and
multiple use of renewable natural resources, including forest,
watershed, range, wildlife, and recreation; history of forest and
range use and its present status.

197. Workshop
a. The Natural Environment: Its Uses and Protection (1) S Field
trips. Offered only through the Horizons Unlimited Summer
Program.
b. Computer Applications in the Natural Sciences (1) S Open to
participants in the Horizons Unlimited Summer Program. P, basic
computer experience.

200. Foundations in History and Policy (3) I Historical and
philosophical developments in natural resources management;
social, political, and economic factors affecting natural
resource use; the role of natural resource managers in today's
society.

202. Natural Resources -- Plant Identification (3) I Plant
classification, identification and nomenclature, with emphasis on
the grass, rose, legume, composite, pine, and other plant
families containing important forest and range plants. Use of
dichotomous keys and recognition of representative species will
be utilized to develop plant identification skills. 1R, 6L.

271. Natural Resources -- Computer Applications (3) II
Application of microcomputer software for management of renewable
natural resources. Includes spreadsheets, data base management
systems, and statistical programs with emphasis on the
introduction to geographic information systems and their
applications. 2R, 3L. Open to majors only. P, STAT 160 or 263,
prior computer experience.

316. Natural Resources -- Ecology (4) I Principles of plant,
animal, and community ecology important to the understanding and
management of renewable natural resources. Field trips. P, ECOL
182, RNR 202; CR, S W 200, 201.

321. Natural Resources -- Measurements (3) I II Study of basic
land, weather, hydrologic and vegetation measurements, and
recreation use and animal census techniques employed in
management of natural resources; methods, instrumentation, data
analysis, presentation and interpretation of results. 2R, 3L. P,
MATH 118, RNR 271.

375. Economics of Land and Water in the American West (3) II
(Identical with AREC 375)

384. Natural Resources -- Management Practices (4) II
Introduction to resource management practices used to achieve
societal goals. Includes practices used to produce water, wood,
forage, wildlife and other renewable resources; to protect water,
soil, wilderness and scenic attractions; and to mitigate the
adverse impacts of management and land-use activities on the
environment. 3R, 3L. Field trips. P, basic ecology course, 316 or
RA M 382.

406. Conservation Biology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ECOL
406) May be convened with 506.

417. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) I
Computer techniques for capture, processing, analysis and display
of geographic information, with emphasis on applications in land
resources management and planning. 2R, 3L. P, basic knowledge of
computer operations. (Identical with GEOG 417 and S W 417) May be
convened with 517.

418. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3) II Advanced
techniques in geographic information systems database
development, manipulation and analysis, emphasizing renewable
natural resource applications. Experience with advanced raster
and vector-based GIS packages on workstation platforms. 2R, 3L.
P, 417. (Identical with GEOG 418) May be convened with 518.

437. Modeling Natural Systems (3) I 1994-95 Techniques for
conceptualization, parameterization, programming, analysis and
validation of computer simulation models of natural and managed
systems. Process-oriented modeling methodologies emphasized. P,
MATH 123, 124 or 125a, RNR 316, computer programming skills. May
be convened with 537.

438. Fire Ecology (3) II Ecological role and use of prescribed
fire in forest and range ecosystems; fire history; concepts and
specific fire effects on vegetation, wildlife, soils and
watersheds. P, basic ecology course, 316 or RA M 382. May be
convened with 538.

476. Natural Resource Economics (3) II (Identical with AREC 476)

478. Global Change (3) II (Identical with GEOS 478) May be
convened with 578.

480. Natural Resources -- Policy and Administration (3) II
Resource policy formation; ethics of resource use; administration
and organization for resource management; analysis of present
policy and trends. P, 200, AREC 375. May be convened with 580.
Writing-Emphasis Course*

481. Environmental Policy (3) II (Identical with POL 481) May be
convened with 581.

486a-486b. Natural Resources -- Management and Economics (3-3)
Introduction to decision-making techniques in natural resources
management, including planning; GIS, modeling, applied economics,
and systems analysis techniques. 2R, 3L. P, AREC 375, RNR 271,
384. May be convened with 586a-586b. 486b is a Writing-Emphasis
Course*

489a-489b. Advanced Environmental Interpretation (2-2) Advanced
training and experience in communication of natural history and
environmental principles to the public. Students must be
available for some weekend field work. 489a is part of a two-
semester sequence. Credit and grade for 489a will be awarded only
upon completion of 489b. Field trips. P, 12 units in biology or
renewable natural resources. May be convened with 589a-589b.

490. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 490) May be convened with 590.

497. Workshop
b. Desert Ecosystems (1) [Rpt./3] II May be convened with 597b.
w. Advanced Cadastral Survey (1-4) II P, prior training and work
experience in cadastral surveying. (Identical with CE 497w) May
be convened with 597w.

*Writing-Emphasis Course. P, Satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

506. Conservation Biology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ECOL
506) May be convened with 406.

517. Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 417. Graduate-level
requirements include a thorough bibliographic review and a
scholarly paper on a current application of geographic
information systems in the student's major field. P, basic
knowledge of computer operations. (Identical with GEOG 517 and S
W  517) May be convened with 417.

518. Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 418. Graduate-level
requirements include a more extensive project and report. P, 517.
(Identical with GEOG 518) May be convened with 418.

527. Artificial Intelligence in Resource Management (3) I 1993-94
Use of artificial intelligence as it applies to natural
resources, including knowledge representation, problem solving,
expert systems, feature recognition, neural networks, and genetic
algorithms. Examples will be derived from current applications
using various techniques to address management problems. P,
computer programming skills.

537. Modeling Natural Systems (3) I 1994-95 For a description of
course topics, see 437. Graduate students will do an expanded
project and report. P, MATH 123, 124 or 125a, RNR 316, computer
programming skills. May be convened with 437.

538. Fire Ecology (3) II For a description of course topics, see
438. Graduate-level requirements include a research report on the
ecological impacts of fire in a specific vegetation type. P,
basic ecology course, 316 or RA M 382. May be convened with 438.

546. Principles of Research (3) I Philosophy of science and the
principles of conducting research, including formulation of
problems, problem analysis, study plans, and preparation of
manuscripts for publication.

555. Advanced Applied Plant Ecology (3) II Discussion of advanced
topics in plant ecology, with emphasis on applied ecology of
terrestrial ecosystems. P, basic ecology and statistics.

575. Economics of Natural Resource Policy (3) II (Identical with
AREC 575)

576. Advanced Natural Resource Economics (3) II (Identical with
AREC 576)

578. Global Change (3) II (Identical with GEOS 578) May be
convened with 478.

580. Natural Resources -- Policy and Administration (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 480. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth policy analysis paper. May be
convened with 480.

581. Environmental Policy (3) II (Identical with POL 581) May be
convened with 481.

586a-586b. Natural Resources -- Management and Economics (3-3)
For a description of course topics, see 486a-486b. Graduate-level
requirements include additional research on a planning project.
May be convened with 486a-486b.

589a-589b. Advanced Environmental Interpretation (2-2) For a
description of course topics, see 489a-489b. Graduate-level
requirements include development and presentation of an original
interpretive program. Students must be available for some weekend
field work. 589a is part of a two-semester sequence. Credit and
grade for 589a will be awarded only upon completion of 589b.
Field trips. P, 12 units in biology or renewable natural
resources. May be convened with 489a-489b.

590. Remote Sensing for the Study of Planet Earth (3) II 1993-94
(Identical with REM 590) May be convened with 490.

595. Colloquium
b. Public Natural Resource Management (2) II 1994-95
c. Human Dimensions in Renewable Natural Resources (3) I 1993-94
d. Topics in Forest and Range Ecology (2) II 1994-95
e. Heritage Resources Planning and Management (2) II 1993-94

596. Seminar
i. Management and Policy for Ecological Sustainability (3) [Rpt.]
I II (Identical with POL 596i, which is home)
m. Conservation Biology (1) [Rpt./6 units] II (Identical with
ECOL 596m, which is home)

597. Workshop
a. Natural Resource Conservation Workshop (1) [Rpt./2] S Field
trips.
b. Desert Ecosystems (1) [Rpt./3] II May be convened with 497b.
w. Advanced Cadastral Survey (1-4) II (Identical with CE 597w)
May be convened with 497w. P, prior training and work experience
in cadastral surveying.

694. Practicum
a. Teaching in Renewable Natural Resource Studies (1-3) [Rpt./4
units] I II
b. Teaching in Range Management (1-3) [Rpt./4 units] I II
c. Teaching in Watershed Management (1-3) [Rpt./4 units] I II
d. Teaching in Wildlife and Fisheries Science (1-3) [Rpt./4
units] I II

696. Seminar
a. Renewable Natural Resources (1-2) [Rpt.] I II
b. Integrating Advanced Technology in RNR (3) I 1993-94

697. Workshop
a. Interdisciplinary Problem Solving in Natural Resources I (2) I
II P, consult department before enrolling. (Identical with HWR
697a, which is home) Note: 697a is part of a two-semester
sequence. Students receive a grade of "K" at the end of the first
semester. Credit and grade for 697a will be awarded only upon
completion of 697b.
b. Interdisciplinary Problem Solving in Natural Resources II (2)
I II P, 697a. (Identical with HWR 697b, which is home) Note: 697b
is part of a two-semester sequence. Credit and grade for 697a
will be awarded only upon completion of 697b.

Landscape Resources

William H. Havens, Program Leader

Landscape Architecture (L AR)

The five-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Landscape
Architecture is composed of two preprofessional and three
professional years. The curriculum is designed to prepare the
student to meet entry-level requirements for the profession of
landscape architecture. While the principles of professional
practice are universal, the program encourages strong linkages in
renewable natural resources and recognition of the unique
qualities of the arid Southwest.

Each applicant must comply with University of Arizona
requirements for admission to the preprofessional phase. Each
applicant to the professional phase must submit an Application
for Admission to the Professional Major form to the Program
Leader by April 15 preceding the intended fall admission.
Students are admitted to the professional phase in the fall
semester only, after having completed the following courses: CHEM
101a, 102a; ECOL 130; ENGL 101, 102 or 103H, 104H; L AR 101, 103,
104, 201, 202; MATH 117R/S, 118; PL S 100; RNR 200, 271, 321; SW
200, 201.

Applicants will be evaluated by the Landscape Architecture
Admissions Committee on the basis of the following criteria:
grade-point average, course work, statement of intent, work
experience, special interests, and creative endeavors. Admission
will be restricted to those applicants with the highest
evaluation. It is unlikely that students with cumulative grade-
point averages less than 2.7500 will be admitted. All applicants
to the professional phase will be notified of acceptance or
rejection by May 15. Applicants seeking advanced standing will be
placed in the preprofessional phase until they fulfill all
requirements for admission to the professional major.

The following courses are required as part of the professional
program in landscape architecture: ARH 118, 207 or ARCH 324, 334;
COMM 100, 102; ECON 201a; ENGL 308; GEOG 103b; L AR 301, 302,
332, 335, 401, 402, 404, 438, 442, 443, 451, 452, 453, 460, 482;
PSYC 101, 371; RNR 202, 384. Students will also take a 12-unit
landscape architecture internship in their final year.

101. Introduction to Landscape Architecture (2) I Introduction to
the profession of landscape architecture.

103. Basic Design I (3) I Understanding the design process, with
emphasis on development of visual language and graphic skills;
study of functional, contextual, spatial, socio-cultural and
environmental factors in influencing design in our physical
environment. 2R, 4S.

104. Basic Design II (3) II Exploring the creative design process
through 2-D and 3-D exercises. Introduction of basic
environmental, functional and aesthetic design criteria. 2R, 4S.
P, 103.

197. Workshop
a. Landscape Architecture (1) S Field trip. Open to participants
in the Horizons Unlimited Summer Program.

201. Intermediate Design I (4) I Introduction to programming,
analysis and problem solving in landscape design. 2R, 5S. P, 104.

202. Intermediate Design II (4) II Introduction to materials and
techniques of graphic communication and their application in
landscape design. 2R, 5S. P, 201.

301. Landscape Architectural Design (4) I Application of the
principles of design to landscape architecture problems. 1R, 8S.
P, 202.

302. Urban Landscape Design (4) II Landscape architectural design
problems in urban environments. 1R, 8S. P, 301.

332. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design for Landscape
Architecture (3) II CDT Introduction to computer-aided design
(CAD) utilizing microcomputers. Course includes theory, ethics,
management and applications for computer use in landscape
architecture. Open only to landscape architecture majors in
professional phase of program. 1R, 4S. P, RNR 271.

335. Plant Materials (4) I Plant materials used in landscape
design. 3R, 3L. Field trips. P, PL S 100, RNR 202 (Identical with
PL S 335)

401. Site Planning and Design (4) I Planning and design problems
at site scale with particular concern for conservation and energy
utilization. 1R, 8S. P, 302. May be convened with 501.

402. Regional Landscape Planning and Design (5) II Planning and
design problems of regional scope and emphasis. 2R, 8S. P, 401.
May be convened with 502.

404. Professional Portfolio Design (1) II Design and preparation
of a professional portfolio. Past projects will be reviewed,
graphically revised, photographed, and integrated into a
professional quality portfolio. Open to majors only. 2R/S. P,
401.

407. The American Landscape (3) II (Identical with GEOG 407) May
be convened with 507.

427. Field Methods in Environmental Psychology (3) II (Identical
with PSYC 427) May be convened with 527.

438. Planting Design (3) II Application of plant materials in
landscape design; principles of xeriscape and energy-conserving
design. Open to majors only. 2R, 2S. P, 335, 401. May be convened
with 538.

442. History and Theory of Landscape Architecture (3) II
Examination of the historical background and theoretical bases of
landscape architecture. May be convened with 542.

443. Contemporary Landscape Architecture (3) I Examination of
modern and post-modern design in landscape architecture. P, 442.
May be convened with 543.

451. Site Engineering (4) I Site layout, grading, drainage,
earthwork calculations and road layout. 2R, 6L. Field trips. P,
202. May be convened with 551.

452. Landscape Construction (4) II Introduction to construction
materials and methods, working drawings and specifications
related to the profession of landscape architecture. 2R, 5L. P,
451. May be convened with 552.

453. Irrigation Design (3) I Principles of irrigation system
design; introduction to system components and applications;
construction responsibilities and design liabilities. 2R, 2S. P,
452. Open to majors only. May be convened with 553.

460. Professional Practice (3) II Professional services, contract
documents, contract administration, office organization, ethics,
professional registration, roles of the landscape architect, the
practice of landscape architecture. P, 402. May be convened with
560. Writing Emphasis Course.*

482. Professional Practice Studio (5) II Synthesis studio in
landscape architecture. Complex problems in regional, site and
urban planning and design. Emphasis upon "real world" problems
and professional practice. Open to majors only. 2R, 7S. P, 402.
May be convened with 582.

497. Workshop
i. Community Design for Non-Designers (3) I (Identical with ARCH
497i, which is home) May be convened with 597i.

*P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

501. Site Planning and Design (4) I For a description of course
topics, see 401. Graduate-level requirements include additional
readings and exercises in site planning and design. P, 302. May
be convened with 401.

502. Regional Landscape Planning and Design (5) II For a
description of course topics, see 402. Graduate-level
requirements include additional readings and exercises in
regional planning and design. 2R, 8S. P, 401. May be convened
with 402.

503. Advanced Landscape Design (3) I Issues and problems in
landscape design. Relationships with architects, engineers,
planners and natural resource scientists are stressed. 1R, 6L.
Field trips.

504. Advanced Landscape Planning (3) II Advanced techniques in
landscape planning and problem analysis including visual
simulation, computer map overlay, video applications, research in
perception and behavior. 1R, 6L.

507. The American Landscape (3) II (Identical with GEOG 507) May
be convened with 407.

527. Field Methods in Environmental Psychology (3) II (Identical
with PSYC 527) May be convened with 427.

533. Landscape Planning (3) I Theories and models in landscape
planning; planning issues, methods, and case studies. Two, 2-day
field trips.

538. Planting Design (3) II For a description of course topics,
see 438. Graduate-level requirements include a topical research
paper on a planting design subject. May be convened with 438.

542. History and Theory of Landscape Architecture (3) II For a
description of course topics, see 442. Graduate-level
requirements include an initial outline and bibliography and
subsequent scholarly paper on a specific person, place, and/or
event. May be convened with 442.

543. Contemporary Landscape Architecture (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 443. Graduate-level requirements include a
topical research paper on a contemporary issue in landscape
architecture. May be convened with 443.

550. Landscape Ecology (3) II Principles and theories of spatial
ecology presented in the context of land management problems in
Southern Arizona. Practical application of productivity theory
emphasized. Field trips. 2R, 3L.

551. Site Engineering (4) I For a description of course topics,
see 451. Graduate-level requirements include additional readings
and exercises in techniques and applications relative to site
engineering. Field trips. P, 202. May be convened with 451.

552. Landscape Construction (4) II For a description of course
topics, see 452. Graduate-level requirements include a scholarly
paper of intellectual inquiry into a material or method used in
landscape construction. P, 451. May be convened with 452.

553. Irrigation Design (3) I For a description of course topics,
see 453. Graduate-level requirements include a topical research
paper on an irrigation design subject. May be convened with 453.

560. Professional Practice (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 460. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
research paper on a topic of professional practice in landscape
architecture. P, 502. May be convened with 460.

582. Professional Practice Studio(5) II For a description of
course topics, see 482. Graduate-level requirements include a
written evaluation of the impact of the student projects on the
environmental, social, political and economic community for which
the project is planned. P, 402. May be convened with 482.

595. Colloquium
d. Landscape Architecture Research (3) I
g. Professional Leadership (1) [Rpt./4 units] I II

596. Seminar
u. Interdisciplinary Environment-Behavior-Design (3) II
(Identical with ENV 596u, which is home)

597. Workshop
i. Community Design for Non-Designers (3) I (Identical with ARCH
597i, which is home) May be convened with 497i.

694. Practicum
a. Landscape Architecture Teaching (1-2) I II

696. Seminar
a. Landscape Architecture (1) [Rpt.] I II

Range Resources

E. Lamar Smith, Program Leader

Range Management (RA M)

The major in range management prepares students to begin
professional careers concerned with management of rangelands for
livestock production, wildlife habitat, watershed protection, and
other range resource values. Range management students obtain a
Bachelor of Science in Renewable Natural Resources. The B.S. in
Renewable Natural Resources meets standards for federal
employment as a range conservationist and is accredited by the
Society for Range Management.

Range management majors may tailor their program to career
objectives by selecting appropriate minors and/or elective
courses. Students planning a career in federal or state rangeland
management agencies are advised to select a minor in wildlife
management or watershed management. Those interested in ranch
management, agricultural lending institutions, private
consulting, international development, ranch appraising, or
similar careers should consult the Department of Agricultural and
Resource Economics for a minor in agricultural and resource
economics. Students planning on careers in research or teaching
may wish to emphasize additional basic sciences and mathematics.

Required courses are: ENGL 101, 102, or 103H, 104H; 307 or 308;
COMM 100, 102; ECON 201a; AREC 375; MCB 181, 460; ECOL 182; CHEM
103a-103b, 104a-104b; STAT 160 or 263; S W 200, 201; AN S 330;
477 or 474; RNR 200, 202, 271, 316, 321, 384, 480, 486a-486b; RA
M 382, 436, 446, 456, 487. In addition, students must complete at
least two of the following: WS M 422; PHYS 102a; S W 431; MATH
123; GEOS 101, 103.

Students majoring in other fields may take a minor in range
management. Twenty-one units of foundation courses must be
completed before the minor is initiated. Foundation courses are
six units of chemistry, eight units of biological sciences, S W
200, 201, and STAT 160 or 263. Required courses in the minor
total 15 units and are RNR 384; RNR 202 or RA M 382; RA M 436,
446, and 456. An additional requirement of five credits of upper-
division courses should be selected in consultation with an
advisor in the faculty of range management.

382. Rangeland Plant Communities of the West (3) II Structure and
function of western U.S. rangeland plant communities focusing on
vegetation dynamics and anthropogenic influences. Laboratory
includes classroom and field identification of communities and
plant species. 2R, 3L. P, RNR 202.

436. Grazing Ecology and Management (2) I Application of animal
diet and nutrition, grazing behavior, and vegetation-soil-
herbivore interactions in management of grazing animals for
improved livestock production, wildlife habitat, watershed
protection, forest reproduction or other land use objectives.
Includes design of water developments, fences and other
structural range improvements. May be convened with 536.

446. Range Vegetation Improvement (3) I Rangeland habitat
manipulation through vegetation control and establishment
including mechanical, chemical, and burning treatments.
Revegetation techniques for rangeland and drastically disturbed
semiarid lands. 2R, 3L. P, MCB 181, ECOL 182, S W 200. May be
convened with 546.

456. Rangeland Inventory and Monitoring (3) I Techniques of
mapping and measuring attributes of vegetation and soils for
inventory and monitoring of rangelands. Interpretation of data
with respect to range condition and trend, watershed protection,
value for livestock and wildlife habitat. P, RNR 202, 321. May be
convened with 556. Writing-Emphasis Course.* 

487. Rangeland Management Plan (2) II Conduct a field inventory,
develop management alternatives, and provide environmental and
economic analyses of alternative management proposals in a
written plan. 6L. All-day field trips. P, 456. May be convened
with 587. Writing-Emphasis Course*

*Writing-Emphasis Courses. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements section of
this catalog).

536. Grazing Ecology and Management (2) I For a description of
course topics, see 436. Graduate-level requirements include
additional required readings and research paper on selected
topic. May be convened with 436.

546. Rangeland Vegetation Improvement (3) I For a description of
course topics, see 446. Graduate-level requirements include a
research paper on an aspect of rangeland improvements. P, MCB
181, ECOL 182, S W 200. May be convened with 446.

556. Rangeland Inventory and Monitoring (3) I For a description
of course topics, see 456. Graduate-level requirements include
additional assigned readings and discussion periods. P, RNR 202,
321. May be convened with 456.

582. Revegetation Ecology (2 II 1993-94 Overview of traditional
and current approaches, principles, ecology, and objectives of
revegetation, reclamation, and restoration of semiarid and arid
wildlands. Field trip. P, ECOL 182 or RNR 316, S W 200.

587. Rangeland Management Plan (2) II For a description of course
topics, see 487. Graduate-level requirements include development
of additional management alternatives and environmental and
economic analyses. All-day field trips. P, 456. May be convened
with 487.

595. Colloquium
a. Rangeland Policy (3) [Rpt.] II 1994-95
b. Range Research Techniques (2) I 1994-95 P, STAT 509.
c. Diet Selection of Free-ranging Ruminants (2) I 1993-94

696. Seminar
a. Rangeland Management (1) [Rpt.] I II

Watershed Resources

Richard H. Hawkins, Program Leader

Watershed Management (WS M)

Watershed management courses, which consider the management needs
of whole watersheds and their multiple uses, qualify the student
for a professional career with resource management agencies.
Emphasis is placed on the use and protection of forests and
rangelands in the Southwest for the critical resources of water,
wildlife habitat, recreation, and other values. Students in
watershed management may select one of several areas of
specialization to further develop their knowledge in physical
hydrology, forest hydrology, rangeland hydrology, soil hydrology,
water quality, or aquatic biology.

In addition to the requirements for the curriculum in natural
resources, students majoring in watershed management must
complete: CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b; ECON 201a; ENGL 101, 102 or
103H, 104H; 307 or 308; MCB 181; ECOL 182; GEOS 101, 103; MATH
125a-125b, STAT 160 or 263; PHYS 102a-102b; RNR 200, 202, 271,
316, 321, 384, 480, 486a-486b; S W 200, 201; COMM 100, 102; ABE
406; AREC 375; ATMO 171; ENGR 101; WS M 460, 462, 468. Students
must also complete 17 units in one of the defined
specializations.

Minors are available in watershed management. Foundation courses
consist of prerequisites to the courses selected for the minor.
The minor consists of 20 units including S W 200, 201; RNR 200,
321, 384. The remaining units may be selected from WS M 408, 410,
460 and 462 in consultation with a watershed faculty advisor.

250. Forest Pathology (3) II (Identical with PL P 250)

330. Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) I (Identical with GEOG
330)

408. Wildland Fire Management (3) I Principles of fire behavior
in forest, range and other vegetation types; interrelationships
of fuels, weather, and topography; pyrolysis and combustion
processes; effects of fire; fuels inventory; prevention,
detection, and control techniques; fire danger rating and fire
behavior modeling. May be convened with 508.

410. Silviculture (3) II Principles and technical procedures for
reproducing and growing stands of woody plants for a variety of
uses; ecologically-based forest management. Weekend field trips.
P, RNR 316. May be convened with 510. Writing-Emphasis Course.*

420. Photogrammetry (1) II 1994-95 Aerial photographic planning
for natural resource management; stereoscopic principles applied
to planimetric and topographic mapping. 3L. P or CR, 422. May be
convened with 520.

422. Photointerpretation (2) II Reading and interpretation of
aerial photographs; natural resource inventory from aerial
photographs; remote sensing techniques. 1R, 3L. May be convened
with 522.

435. Water Management in Dryland Ecosystems (3) I Hydrologic
principles as applied to arid and semiarid ecosystems with water
management applications in dryland resources management. P, STAT
160 or 263, S W 201. May be convened with 535.

460. Watershed Hydrology (4) I Application of fundamental
principles to quantifying the basic hydrologic processes
occurring on watersheds. P, GEOS 101, S W 200, 201; STAT 160 or
263. 3R, 3L. (Identical with HWR 460) May be convened with 560.

461. Watershed Field Studies (3) S Field methods of watershed
data base management. Field studies to assess environmental
impact of human intervention on watersheds. Field trips. Fee. P,
460 and 462. May be convened with 561. 

462. Watershed Management (4) II Evaluating hydrologic impacts of
management activities on watersheds to include silviculture,
range, mining, and recreation use. 3R, 3L. P, 460. May be
convened with 562.

463. Plant-Water Relations (3) II (Identical with PL S 463) May
be convened with 563.

464. Introduction to Dendrochronology (4) (Identical with GEOS
464) May be convened with 564.

467. Advanced Watershed Hydrology (3) II Advanced topics in
watershed hydrology; rainfall-runoff, infiltration, overland flow
routing, sediment modeling, statistical analysis and research
methods in hydrology. P, 460. May be convened with 567.

468. Wildland Water Quality (3) II Introduction to water quality
and its influences in natural environments. Interactions with
land management and relationships to the larger issues of
environmental quality. Field trips. May be convened with 568.

497. Workshop
c. Dendrochronology (2) 3L. May be convened with 597c. (Identical
with GEOS 497c, which is home)

*P, satisfaction of the upper-division writing-proficiency
requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses" in the Academic
Policies and Graduation Requirements section of this catalog).

508. Wildland Fire Management (3) I For a description of course
topics, see 408. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper on a specific fire issue or problem in the student's
professional discipline area. May be convened with 408.

510. Silviculture (3) II For a description of course topics, see
410. Graduate-level requirements include a creative endeavor
applicable to silviculture. Weekend field trips. P, RNR 316. May
be convened with 410.

515. Mensuration (3) II 1994-95 Measurement and inventory of
forest land, forest growth, raw materials and products. Special
analysis of mensurational data from an arid land inventory. P,
RNR 271, 321, MATH 123. 

520. Photogrammetry (1) II 1994-95 For a description of course
topics, see 420. Graduate-level requirements include a scholarly
paper on geodetic control, topographic mapping techniques, or
computer mapping. P or CR 522. May be convened with 420.

522. Photointerpretation (2) II For a description of course
topics, see 422. Graduate-level requirements include the
preparation of a detailed report based on the application of the
principles of photointerpretation to a specific problem in the
management of natural resources. May be convened with 422.

531. Dryland Forest Management (3) II 1994-95 Utilization and
management of forest resources in dry environments; biophysical
and socio-economic issues related to the development of forest
commodities and amenities. P, 6 units of upper-division WS M

532. Agroforestry (3) I 1993-94 Ecological and socioeconomic
factors related to the planning and implementation of
agroforestry systems. P, 6 units of upper-division WS M

534. Tree Nursery Management (3) I 1994-95 Tree nursery
establishment and management, with emphasis on dryland
ecosystems. P, 6 units of upper-division WS M

535. Water Management in Dryland Ecosystems (3) I For a
description of course topics, see 435. Graduate-level
requirements include a report and oral presentation on a topic
related to hydrology or water management  in dryland ecosystems.
(Identical with AR L 535) May be convened with 435.

560. Watershed Hydrology (4) I For a description of course
topics, see 460. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth
paper on the application of hydrologic principles to problems in
watershed management. 3R, 3L. P, GEOS 101; S W 200, 201; STAT 160
or 263. (Identical with HWR 560) May be convened with 460.

561. Watershed Field Studies (3) S For a description of course
topics, see 461. Graduate-level requirements include a research
paper related to watershed data base management or completion of
a data analysis project. P, 560, 562. May be convened with 461. 

562. Watershed Management (4) II For a description of course
topics, see 462. Graduate-level requirements include the
development of a watershed management scenario and accompanying
report. 3R, 3L. P, 460. May be convened with 462.

563. Plant-Water Relations (3) II (Identical with PL S 563) May
be convened with 463.

564. Introduction to Dendrochronology (4) (Identical with GEOS
564) May be convened with 464.

565. Environmental Hydrochemistry (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with
S W 565)

567. Advanced Watershed Hydrology (3) II For a description of
course topics, see 467. Graduate students will be required to do
additional exercises. P, 560. May be convened with 467.

568. Wildland Water Quality (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 468. Graduate-level requirements include a class
report and presentation on a negotiated topic of interest. Field
trips. May be convened with 468.

577. Advanced Topics in the Economics of Environmental Regulation
(3) II (Identical with AREC 577)

595. Colloquium
e. Dendrochronology: Physical Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II
(Identical with GEOS 595e, which is home)
f. Dendrochronology: Biological Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II
(Identical with GEOS 595f, which is home)
g. Dendrochronology: Chronometric Applications (3) [Rpt./2] I II
(Identical with GEOS 595g, which is home)

597. Workshop
c. Dendrochronology (2) 3L. May be convened with 497c. (Identical
with GEOS 597c, which is home)

602. Snow Hydrology (2) II 1993-94 The significance of snow in
hydrologic budgets of watersheds and river basins, and potentials
for snowpack management. P, 560, 562.

605. Watershed Catchment Modeling (3) I Distributed modeling of
hydrological and sedimentation processes at the catchment scale
emphasis on current concepts and applications. P, 560, 562 and
computer programming.

696. Seminar
a. Watershed Management (1-2) [Rpt.] I II

Wildlife and Fisheries Resources

William W. Shaw, Program Leader

Wildlife and Fisheries Science (WFSC)

A major in wildlife and fisheries science prepares the student
for careers that apply ecological sciences for the management and
conservation of fish and wildlife resources. Career opportunities
include positions with state fish and wildlife agencies, federal
wildlife and land management agencies, environmental consulting
firms, and nongovernmental conservation organizations. The major
has two closely related options; fisheries science and wildlife
ecology. Students are encouraged to obtain practical experience
as summer employees, interns, or volunteers with natural resource
management agencies or conservation organizations.

In addition to the requirements for the curriculum in natural
resources, the following courses are required for both options in
wildlife and fisheries science: CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b, 241a,
243a; ECON 201a; AREC 375; ENGL 101, 102 or 103H, 104H; 307 or
308; MCB 181; ECOL 182; 320 or AN S 213; PHYS 102a, 180a; S W
200, 201; COMM 100, 102; MATH 123 or 124 or 125a; STAT 160 or
263; RA M 382; RNR 200, 202, 271, 316, 321, 384, 480, 486a-486b;
WS M 410; WFSC 444, 446, 448, 455R. The wildlife ecology option
also requires: V SC 400a or 400b; two courses from WFSC 483, 484,
485. The fisheries science option also requires: CHEM 241b, 243b;
WS M 468; WFSC 441, 455L, 482.

A minor is available in wildlife and fisheries science. Twenty-
one units of foundation courses must be completed before the
minor is initiated. Foundation courses are CHEM 103a-103b, STAT
160 or 263, MCB 181; ECOL 182, and S W 200, 201. Required courses
in the minor are RNR 200, 321, 384 and a minimum of 10 units from
the following: WFSC 441, 444, 446, 455R, 482, 483, 484, 485.

125. Introduction to Wildlife Conservation (3) I Survey of
conservation history, ecological principles, wildlife management
techniques, and contemporary wildlife conservation issues.
Intended for non-majors. 

126. Wildlife Conservation Laboratory (1) I Laboratory exercises
and field trips covering conservation techniques; animal census,
habitat analysis, population dynamics, and management techniques.
3L. Field trips. P, CR, 125.

213. Animal Genetics (3) I (Identical with AN S 213)

330. Principles of Nutrition (3) I II (Identical with AN S 330)

405. Aquatic Entomology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ENTO 405)
May be convened with 505.

441. Limnology (4) I Study of lakes and streams; biological
characteristics, as related to physical, chemical, geological,
and historical processes operating on fresh waters. 2R, 6L.
Weekend field trips. P, six units of biology and 3 units of
chemistry. (Identical with ECOL 441) May be convened with 541.

444. Wildlife Management/Mammalian Species (4) I Management of
wildlife as a resource; characteristics of wildlife species;
principles of population dynamics in wildlife populations;
techniques used in studying wildlife. 3R, 3L and field work.
Weekend field trips. P, RNR 384. May be convened with 544.
Writing-Emphasis Course.*

446. Wildlife Management/Avian Species (4) II Field and
laboratory methods used in avian species management; evaluation
of avian habitats; census, productivity, diagnosis, and control
of avian populations. 3R, 3L and field work. Weekend field trips.
P, RNR 384. May be convened with 546.

448. Current Problems in Wildlife Ecology (1) [Rpt.] I
Discussions and assignments covering current problems, including
the biological, economic, aesthetic, political, and sociological
phases of wildlife management. P, 444 or 446.

449. Diseases of Wildlife (3) II (Identical with V SC 449) May be
convened with 549.

455R. Fishery Management (3) II Methods and concepts pertaining
to fishery investigations and management; application of
principles for enhancement of fisheries and aquatic habitats. P,
441 or 444. May be convened with 555R. Writing-Emphasis Course.*

455L. Fishery Management Laboratory (1) II Field and laboratory
methods pertaining to fishery investigations and management. P,
CR, 455R, 482. May be convened with 555L.

456. Aquaculture (3) II 1993-94 Overview lectures and assigned
readings on the theory and practice of aquaculture. Includes the
culture of seaweeds, mollusks, crustaceans, and finfish. Field
trips. P, ECOL 181, 182, CHEM 103a-103b, 104a-104b. (Identical
with V SC 456) May be convened with 556.

482. Ichthyology (4) I 1993-94 (Identical with ECOL 482) May be
convened with 582.

483. Herpetology (4) II (Identical with ECOL 483) May be convened
with 583.

484. Ornithology (4) II (Identical with ECOL 484) May be convened
with 584.

485. Mammalogy (4) I (Identical with ECOL 485) May be convened
with 585.

489. Selected Studies of Birds (2) I [Rpt.] (Identical with ECOL
489) May be convened with 589.

*Writing-Emphasis Course. P, satisfaction of the upper-division
writing-proficiency requirement (see "Writing-Emphasis Courses"
in the Academic Policies and Graduation Requirements of this
catalog).

505. Aquatic Entomology (3) II 1994-95 (Identical with ENTO 505)
May be convened with 405.

541. Limnology (4) I For a description of course topics, see 441.
Graduate-level requirements include a report that synthesizes
literature on a research issue of current concern, an in-class
presentation and several discussion meetings. Weekend field
trips. P, six units of biology and 3 units of chemistry.
(Identical with ECOL 541) May be convened with 441.

544. Wildlife Management/Mammalian Species (4) I For a
description of course topics, see 444. Graduate-level
requirements include an in-depth research paper on an aspect of
wildlife management and an oral presentation of results. Weekend
field trips. P, RNR 384. May be convened with 444.

546. Wildlife Management/Avian Species (4) II For a description
of course topics, see 446. Graduate-level requirements include an
in-depth research paper on an aspect of avian wildlife management
and an oral presentation of the results. Weekend field trips. P,
RNR 384. May be convened with 446.

549. Diseases of Wildlife (3) II (Identical with V SC 549) May be
convened with 449.

555R. Fishery Management (3) II For a description of course
topics, see 455R. Graduate-level requirements include a report on
a current issue in management and a report on a research issue,
plus several discussion meetings. P, 441 or 444. May be convened
with 455R.

555L. Fishery Management Laboratory (1) II For a description of
course topics, see 455L. Graduate-level requirements include a
detailed report and presentation on a current advance in field or
laboratory methods of study. P, CR, 555R, 582. May be convened
with 455L.

556. Aquaculture (3) II 1993-94 For a description of course
topics, see 456. Graduate-level requirements include a topic
report (Identical with V SC 556) May be convened with 456.

581. Conservation, Biology, and Management of Large Mammals (3) I
1994-95 An in-depth examination of the ecology and management of
big game in North America and an introduction to large mammals
and megaherbivores in Asia, Europe, and Africa. Field trip. P,
444/544.

582. Ichthyology (4) I 1993-94 (Identical with ECOL 582) May be
convened with 482.

583. Herpetology (4) II (Identical with ECOL 583) May be convened
with 483.

584. Ornithology (4) II (Identical with ECOL 584) May be convened
with 484.

585. Mammalogy (4) I (Identical with ECOL 585) May be convened
with 485.

589. Selected Studies of Birds (2) I [Rpt.] (Identical with ECOL
589) May be convened with 489.

595. Colloquium

c. Wildlife Habitat Analysis (2) II 1993-94.

649. Fishery-Water Quality and Toxicology (3) I Pertinent water
quality parameters essential for fish life, and the effects of
various substances and their interrelationships to fish and
aquatic organisms. 2R, 3L. P, 441 or 455R; CHEM 241a. (Identical
with V SC 649)

695. Colloquium
a. Advanced Issues in Fisheries and Wildlife Science (2) [Rpt./3]
II

696. Seminar (1-3)
a. Fish and Wildlife Ecology (1) [Rpt.] II

 


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