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Summer 2002 Course Descriptions
Key to Course Descriptions

All courses below are approved to be taught in Summer 2002; however, some (or all) may not be offered.  The course numbers that are offered, in either Pre-Session, Summer I or Summer II, are linked to the Schedule of Classes.  See the Summer site for more Summer Session details.

Philosophy (PHIL)  Department Info

PHIL 110 -- Logic and Critical Thinking  (3 units)
Description:  Designed to improve ability to reason and think critically; emphasis on evaluating and presenting arguments. Includes a basic introduction to logic and scientific reasoning.
Prerequisite(s):  Math Readiness Test score of at least 100 and have satisfied the 1998-99 admissions requirement for mathematics.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 111 -- Introduction to Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Selected basic philosophical areas and problems: knowledge, belief and truth; the world and God; nature of persons; action and free will; the good life; the ideal community.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 113 -- Introduction to Moral and Social Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to moral and political theory, and problems of practical ethics. Readings from representative moral and social philosophers.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 121 -- Philosophical Foundations of Western Civilization: Justice and Virtue  (3 units)
Description:  Classical, medieval and modern moral and political thought; theories of human good, natural rights, political obligation, relation of individual and state, class conflict.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 195A -- Topics in Philosophy  (1 unit)
Description:  Instruction often includes lectures by several different persons, usually in a small group setting. Designed to give students insight into the concepts and practices which typify different academic disciplines, and introduce students to the methods and standards of the discipline for discovering new knowledge, the values which characterize the field of study, advances in the field, impact on society, and career opportunities.  This is a First-Year Colloquium Course.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 199 -- Independent Study  (1-4 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 202 -- Introduction to Symbolic Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Truth-functional logic and quantification theory; deductive techniques and translation into symbolic notation.
Identical to:  MATH 202.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 211 -- Meaning in Language and Society  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to linguistic, psychological, philosophical and social aspects; meaning structures; meaning in the mind/brain; acquisition of word meaning; the differences between literal/figurative meaning; metaphors; meaning in social contexts, models of representation.
Prerequisite(s):  INDV 101.
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Individuals and Societies.
Typical structure:  2 hours discussion, 2 hours lecture.
Identical to:  LING 211; LING is home department.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 222 -- African American Studies: A History of Ideas  (3 units)
Description:  The theoretical and philosophical ideas expressed by thinkers of the African world. Issues in the areas of epistemological relativism, ethics, political philosophy and the history of ideas will be examined.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Traditions and Cultures (TRAD 101,102,103,104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Humanities.
Approved as:  General Education Gender, Race, Class, Ethnicity, or Non-Western Area Studies.
Identical to:  AFAS 222; AFAS is home department.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 233 -- Philosophy of Religion  (3 units)
Description:  Nature of religion; existence and nature of God; religion and meaning, values and knowledge.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Individuals and Societies (INDV 101, 102, 103, 104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Individuals and Societies.
Identical to:  RELI 233.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 238 -- Philosophy in Literature  (3 units)
Description:  Philosophical analysis of selected literary works.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 245 -- Existential Problems  (3 units)
Description:  Exploration of central problems of the human condition, such as meaning of life; death; self-deception; authenticity, integrity and responsibility; guilt and shame; love and sexuality.
Identical to:  RELI 245.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 260 -- Ancient Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of Greek philosophy, from the pre-Socratic philosophers through Plato and Aristotle to post-Aristotelian philosophers.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Traditions and Cultures (TRAD 101,102,103,104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Humanities.
Identical to:  CLAS 260.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 261 -- Medieval Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  The course focuses on three important thinkers in the Christian medieval tradition-Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas. Topics covered: knowledge and skepticism, free will and the problem of evil, the nature and existence of God, and problem of universals.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Traditions and Cultures (TRAD 101,102,103,104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Humanities.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 262 -- Early Modern Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of major 17th and 18th century British and European philosophers, chosen from Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Traditions and Cultures (TRAD 101,102,103,104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Humanities.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 263 -- From Hegel Nietzsche: 19th Century Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of influential 19th century philosophers, including Hegel, Marx, J.S. Mill, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. Their views on the individual and society, and human nature.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 264 -- 20th Century Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of major analytic and continental philosophers of the 20th century including Peirce, Dewey, James, Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Ayer, Carnap, Austin, Quine, Husserl, Sartre, Heidegger and Derrida.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Individuals and Societies (INDV 101, 102, 103, 104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Individuals and Societies.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 299 -- Independent Study  (2-4 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 299H -- Honors Independent Study  (1-2 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 305 -- Introduction to Philosophy of Science  (3 units)
Description:  Basic issues in the logic of science: scientific concepts and their meaning, testing of hypotheses, explanation, measurement, role of mathematics, truth versus convention, limits of science.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Natural Sciences (NATS 101, 102, 104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Natural Sciences.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 321 -- Medical Ethics  (3 units)
Description:  Ethical issues that arise in relation to medicine and health care: abortion, euthanasia, the allocation of scarce medical resources, socialized medicine, doctor-patient confidentiality, paternalism, etc.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 322 -- Business Ethics  (3 units)
Description:  Selected ethical issues in business, including corporate responsibility, preferential hiring and reverse discrimination, advertising practices, environmental responsibility.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 323 -- Environmental Ethics  (3 units)
Description:  Do we have an obligation to recycle? What can and what should we do about the quality of our air and water? In general, what are the proper environmental responsibilities of government, business, community organizations, and individual citizens?
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Individuals and Societies.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 344 -- Issues and Methods in Analytic Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Designed to improve ability to think analytically, with emphasis on analytic methodology. Selected readings on the nature of mental states, the analytic/synthetic distinction, personal identity, the concept of knowledge and justified belief, the theory of reference, and the distinction between science and pseudo-science.  This is a Writing Emphasis Course.
Prerequisite(s):  satisfaction of the upper-division writing proficiency requirement; PHIL 202.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 346 -- Minds, Brains and Computers  (3 units)
Description:  An introduction to cognitive science; current issues relating to minds as computers, neuroscience, vision and language.
Prerequisite(s):  two courses from Tier One, Individuals and Societies (INDV 101, 102, 103, 104).
Approved as:  General Education Tier Two - Individuals and Societies.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  PSYC 346.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 376 -- Introduction to the Philosophy of Language  (3 units)
Description:  A survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language.
Identical to:  LING 376.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 396H -- Honors Proseminar  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 399 -- Independent Study  (1-4 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 399H -- Honors Independent Study  (1-3 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 400 -- Special Topics in Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Topic varies according to the research interests and specialization of the instructor.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
May be convened with:  PHIL 500.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 401A -- Symbolic Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Intermediate propositional logic and quantificational theory, natural deduction, axiom systems, elementary metatheorems, introduction to notions of modal logic, selected topics in philosophy of logic. Credit allowed for only one of these course: PHIL 401A, PHIL 402.
Identical to:  C SC 401A, MATH 401A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 501A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 401B -- Symbolic Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Advanced propositional logic and quantification theory; metatheorems on consistency, independence, and completeness; set theory, number theory, and modal theory; recursive function theory and Goedel's incompleteness theorem.
Identical to:  MATH 401B, C SC 401B.
May be convened with:  PHIL 501B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 402 -- Mathematical Logic  (3 units)
Description:  [Taught alternate years 2001 - 2002] Sentential calculus, predicate calculus; consistency, independence, completeness, and the decision problem. Designed to be of interest to majors in mathematics or philosophy.
Prerequisite(s):  MATH 124 or MATH 125; experience with theoretical mathematical reasoning. Credit allowed for only one of these courses: MATH 402 or MATH 401A.
Identical to:  MATH 402; MATH is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 502.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 403 -- Foundations of Mathematics  (3 units)
Description:  [Taught alternate years 2001 - 2002] Topics in set theory such as functions, relations, direct products, transfinite induction and recursion, cardinal and ordinal arithmetic; related topics such as axiomatic systems, the development of the real number system, recursive functions.
Prerequisite(s):  MATH 215.
Identical to:  MATH 403; MATH is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 503.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 410A -- History of Moral and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Reading and analysis of selected texts from the Greeks to the present. Course focuses on the history of moral philosophy.
May be convened with:  PHIL 510A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 410B -- History of Moral and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Reading and analysis of selected texts from the Greeks to the present. Course focuses on the history of social and political philosophy.
May be convened with:  PHIL 510B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 412 -- Readings in Greek Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Extensive readings in Greek in one of the following areas of Greek philosophy: the pre-Socratics, Plato's ethic and epistemology, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.  This is a Writing Emphasis Course.
Prerequisite(s):  satisfaction of the upper-division writing proficiency requirement; GRK 202.
May be repeated:  for a total of 6 units of credit.
Identical to:  GRK 412.
May be convened with:  PHIL 512.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 414 -- Philosophical Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to modal logic; problems of interpretation and application; extensions to such areas as tense logic, epistemic logic, deontic logic.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 416 -- Philosophy of Mathematics  (3 units)
Description:  Problems at the foundations of geometry and set theory. Logicism, formalism, and intuitionism. Nominalism vs. realism. Epistemology of mathematics.
May be convened with:  PHIL 516.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 419 -- Induction and Probability  (3 units)
Description:  Basic philosophical problems concerning justification of induction, confirmation of scientific hypotheses, and meaning of probability concepts.
May be convened with:  PHIL 519.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 420 -- Philosophy of Science  (3 units)
Description:  Problems arising from reflection on the sciences. Topics may include explanation, structure and evaluation of theories, experimental knowledge, scientific realism, the place of philosophy in science studies.
May be convened with:  PHIL 520.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 421 -- Philosophy of the Biological Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Laws and models in biology, structure of evolutionary theory, teleological explanations, reductionism, sociobiology.
Identical to:  ECOL 421.
May be convened with:  PHIL 521.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 426 -- Philosophy of the Physical Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Philosophical problems of space, time, and motion. Topics may include the nature of geometrical knowledge, the philosophical impact of relativity theory, absolute versus relative conceptions of space and time.
May be convened with:  PHIL 526.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 427 -- Philosophy of the Physical Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Theories and models. Measurement, experimentation, testing hypothesis. Philosophical problems concerning explanation, causation, and law of nature. Philosophical problems raised by quantum mechanics and/or other physical theories.
Identical to:  PHYS 427.
May be convened with:  PHIL 527.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 430A -- Ethical Theory  (3 units)
Description:  Meta-ethics-meaning of moral terms, relativism, subjectivism, ethics and science, social contract theory.
May be convened with:  PHIL 530A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 430B -- Ethical Theory  (3 units)
Description:  Normative ethics-Utilitarianism, egoism, rights, natural law, justice, deontological duties, blameworthiness and excuses.
May be convened with:  PHIL 530B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 432 -- Psychology of Language  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to language processing. The psychological processes involved in the comprehension and production of sounds, words, and sentences. Other topics may include language breakdown and acquisition, brain and language, and bilingual processing.
Prerequisite(s):  LING 201 or PSYC 101.
Identical to:  LING 432; LING is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 532.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 433 -- Aesthetics  (3 units)
Description:  Classical and contemporary theories of art; the aesthetic experience, form and content, meaning, problems in interpretation and criticism of works of art.
May be convened with:  PHIL 533.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 434 -- Social and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Fundamental concepts of politics; leading social and political theories, such as anarchism, social contract, Marxism.
May be convened with:  PHIL 534.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 436 -- Games and Decisions  (3 units)
Description:  Classical theory of subjective probability, utility, and rational choice, with applications to games theory and social welfare theory.
Prerequisite(s):  MATH 114.
May be convened with:  PHIL 536.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 438A -- Philosophy of Law  (3 units)
Description:  Nature and validity of law; law and morality, judicial reasoning, law and liberty.
Identical to:  POL 438A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 538A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 440 -- Metaphysics  (3 units)
Description:  Topics include free will and determinism; causation; personal identity; necessity and essence; truth, realism and ontology.
May be convened with:  PHIL 540.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 441 -- Theory of Knowledge  (3 units)
Description:  Critical examination of some of the major problems concerning evidence, justification, knowledge, memory, perception and induction.
May be convened with:  PHIL 541.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 442 -- Knowledge and Cognition  (3 units)
Description:  Issues in philosophy and psychology of knowledge, with emphasis on cognitive mechanisms. Perception, memory, concepts, mental representation, problem-solving, reasoning and rationality.
Prerequisite(s):  two philosophy courses.
Identical to:  PSYC 442.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 443 -- Knowledge and Society  (3 units)
Description:  Social and interpersonal processes affecting the acquisition and diffusion of knowledge. Emphasis on philosophical perspectives, with interdisciplinary borrowings.
Prerequisite(s):  one course in philosophy.
Identical to:  IRLS 443.
May be convened with:  PHIL 543.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 445 -- Neural Network Models  (3 units)
Description:  Hands-on introduction to artificial neural networks. The basic principles and tools required to develop neural models, and/or to effectively apply technology.
Prerequisite(s):  PSYC 290A or PSYC290B; PSYC 325 or PSYC 346 or PSYC 402, college-level algebra skills; probability/statistics, computer familiarity either with Unix PCC, or Mac.
Identical to:  PSYC 445; PSYC is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 545.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 450 -- Philosophy of Mind  (3 units)
Description:  Topics include the nature of mental states; the relation between mind and brain; and analysis of perception, emotion, memory and action.
May be convened with:  PHIL 550.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 451 -- Philosophy and Psychology  (3 units)
Description:  Investigation of philosophical issues arising from current work in psychology including perception, reasoning, memory, motivation and action.
Identical to:  PSYC 451.
May be convened with:  PHIL 551.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 455 -- Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence  (3 units)
Description:  Interdisciplinary problems lying at the interface of philosophy and artificial intelligence.
Identical to:  PSYC 455, C SC 455.
May be convened with:  PHIL 555.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 463 -- Philosophy of Language  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language such as: speech acts, reference, meaning, logical form.
Identical to:  LING 463.
May be convened with:  PHIL 563.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 465 -- Pragmatics  (3 units)
Description:  Study of language use, its relationship to language structure and context; topics such as speech acts, presupposition, implication, performatives, conversations
Identical to:  LING 465.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 467 -- Early Analytic Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  The 50 year rise of analytic philosophy from Frege through early Russell to Wittgenstein's Tractatus.
May be convened with:  PHIL 567.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 470 -- Greek Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Topics in Greek philosophy. May be selected from the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and post-Aristotelian philosophy.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  CLAS 470.
May be convened with:  PHIL 570.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 471A -- Rationalism and Empiricism  (3 units)
Description:  Rationalists of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant.
May be convened with:  PHIL 571A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 471B -- Rationalism and Empiricism  (3 units)
Description:  Empiricists of the 17th and 18th centuries: Locke, Berkeley, Hume.
May be convened with:  PHIL 571B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 472A -- Ancient Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  A philosophical introduction to the major works of Plato.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  CLAS 472A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 572A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 472B -- Ancient Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  A philosophical introduction to the major works of Aristotle.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  CLAS 472B.
May be convened with:  PHIL 572B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 493L -- Legislative Internship  (1-6 units)
Description:  Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees. Participating programs include but are not limited to: architecture, economics, English, geography and regional development, history, hydrology, journalism, management, management information systems, marketing, political science, psychology, public administration, secondary education, sociology, statistics, and urban planning. Students in other programs are eligible and should consult the department head or, in the case of the James E. Roger's College of Law, the dean, for appropriate arrangements.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 498 -- Senior Capstone  (3 units)
Description:  A culminating experience for majors involving a substantive project that demonstrates a synthesis of learning accumulated in the major, including broadly comprehensive knowledge of the discipline and its methodologies. Senior standing required.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 498H -- Honors Thesis  (3 units)
Description:  An honors thesis is required of all the students graduating with honors. Students ordinarily sign up for this course as a two-semester sequence. The first semester the student performs research under the supervision of a faculty member; the second semester the student writes an honors thesis.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 499 -- Independent Study  (1-4 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 499H -- Honors Independent Study  (3 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 500 -- Special Topics in Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Topic varies according to the research interests and specialization of the instructor. Graduate-level requirements require more depth and breadth with more extensive reading assignments.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  LAW 500.
May be convened with:  PHIL 400.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 501A -- Symbolic Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Intermediate propositional logic and quantificational theory, natural deduction, axiom systems, elementary metatheorems, introduction to notions of modal logic, selected topics in philosophy of logic. Credit allowed for only one of these course: PHIL 401A, PHIL 402. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  MATH 501A, C SC 501A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 401A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 501B -- Symbolic Logic  (3 units)
Description:  Advanced propositional logic and quantification theory; metatheorems on consistency, independence, and completeness; set theory, number theory, and modal theory; recursive function theory and Goedel's incompleteness theorem. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  MATH 501B, C SC 501B.
May be convened with:  PHIL 401B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 502 -- Mathematical Logic  (3 units)
Description:  [Taught alternate years 2001 - 2002] Sentential calculus, predicate calculus; consistency, independence, completeness, and the decision problem. Designed to be of interest to majors in mathematics or philosophy. [Taught alternate years 2001 - 2002] Graduate-level requirements include more extensive problem sets or advanced projects.
Identical to:  MATH 502; MATH is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 402.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 503 -- Foundations of Mathematics  (3 units)
Description:  [Taught alternate years 2001 - 2002] Topics in set theory such as functions, relations, direct products, transfinite induction and recursion, cardinal and ordinal arithmetic; related topics such as axiomatic systems, the development of the real number system, recursive functions. [Taught alternate years 2001-2002] Graduate-level requirements include more extensive problem sets or advanced projects.
Identical to:  MATH 503; MATH is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 403.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 510A -- History of Moral and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Reading and analysis of selected texts from the Greeks to the present. Course focuses on the history of moral philosophy. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 410A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 510B -- History of Moral and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Reading and analysis of selected texts from the Greeks to the present. Course focuses on the history of social and political philosophy. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 410B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 512 -- Readings in Greek Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Extensive readings in Greek in one of the following areas of Greek philosophy: the pre-Socratics, Plato's ethic and epistemology, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Graduate-level requirements extensive reading and an in-depth paper.
Prerequisite(s):  3 units of 400-level Greek.
May be repeated:  for a total of 6 units of credit.
Identical to:  GRK 512.
May be convened with:  PHIL 412.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 516 -- Philosophy of Mathematics  (3 units)
Description:  Problems at the foundations of geometry and set theory. Logicism, formalism, and intuitionism. Nominalism vs. realism. Epistemology of mathematics. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 416.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 519 -- Induction and Probability  (3 units)
Description:  Basic philosophical problems concerning justification of induction, confirmation of scientific hypotheses, and meaning of probability concepts. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 419.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 520 -- Philosophy of Science  (3 units)
Description:  Problems arising from reflection on the sciences. Topics may include explanation, structure and evaluation of theories, experimental knowledge, scientific realism, the place of philosophy in science studies. Graduate-level requirements include attending an additional class meeting once every two weeks with additional reading and a 15-30 page term paper.
May be convened with:  PHIL 420.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 521 -- Philosophy of the Biological Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Laws and models in biology, structure of evolutionary theory, teleological explanations, reductionism, sociobiology. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  ECOL 521.
May be convened with:  PHIL 421.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 522 -- Lexical Semantics  (3 units)
Description:  Study of word and sentence meaning, relationship between the lexicon and the grammar, idioms, metaphor, etymology, and change of meaning.
Prerequisite(s):  one course in linguistics.
Identical to:  LING 522; LING is home department.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 526 -- Philosophy of the Physical Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Philosophical problems of space, time, and motion. Topics may include the nature of geometrical knowledge, the philosophical impact of relativity theory, absolute versus relative conceptions of space and time.
May be convened with:  PHIL 426.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 527 -- Philosophy of the Physical Sciences  (3 units)
Description:  Theories and models. Measurement, experimentation, testing hypothesis. Philosophical problems concerning explanation, causation, and law of nature. Philosophical problems raised by quantum mechanics and/or other physical theories. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 427.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 530A -- Ethical Theory  (3 units)
Description:  Meta-ethics-meaning of moral terms, relativism, subjectivism, ethics and science, social contract theory. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 430A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 530B -- Ethical Theory  (3 units)
Description:  Normative ethics-Utilitarianism, egoism, rights, natural law, justice, deontological duties, blameworthiness and excuses. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 430B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 532 -- Psychology of Language  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to language processing. The psychological processes involved in the comprehension and production of sounds, words, and sentences. Other topics may include language breakdown and acquisition, brain and language, and bilingual processing. Graduate-level requirements include more extensive readings and writing.
Identical to:  LING 532; LING is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 432.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 533 -- Aesthetics  (3 units)
Description:  Classical and contemporary theories of art; the aesthetic experience, form and content, meaning, problems in interpretation and criticism of works of art. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 433.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 534 -- Social and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Fundamental concepts of politics; leading social and political theories, such as anarchism, social contract, Marxism. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 434.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 536 -- Games and Decisions  (3 units)
Description:  Classical theory of subjective probability, utility, and rational choice, with applications to games theory and social welfare theory. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 436.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 538A -- Philosophy of Law  (3 units)
Description:  Nature and validity of law; law and morality, judicial reasoning, law and liberty. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  POL 538A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 438A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 540 -- Metaphysics  (3 units)
Description:  Topics include free will and determinism; causation; personal identity; necessity and essence; truth, realism and ontology. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research project on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 440.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 541 -- Theory of Knowledge  (3 units)
Description:  Critical examination of some of the major problems concerning evidence, justification, knowledge, memory, perception and induction. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 441.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 543 -- Knowledge and Society  (3 units)
Description:  Social and interpersonal processes affecting the acquisition and diffusion of knowledge. Emphasis on philosophical perspectives, with interdisciplinary borrowings. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  IRLS 543.
May be convened with:  PHIL 443.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 545 -- Neural Network Models  (3 units)
Description:  Hands-on introduction to artificial neural networks. The basic principles and tools required to develop neural models, and/or to effectively apply technology. Graduate-level requirements include a more substantial modeling project.
Identical to:  PSYC 545; PSYC is home department.
May be convened with:  PHIL 445.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 550 -- Philosophy of Mind  (3 units)
Description:  Topics include the nature of mental states; the relation between mind and brain; and analysis of perception, emotion, memory and action. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 450.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 551 -- Philosophy and Psychology  (3 units)
Description:  Investigation of philosophical issues arising from current work in psychology including perception, reasoning, memory, motivation and action. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  PSYC 551.
May be convened with:  PHIL 451.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 555 -- Philosophy and Artificial Intelligence  (3 units)
Description:  Interdisciplinary problems lying at the interface of philosophy and artificial intelligence. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  PSYC 555, C SC 555.
May be convened with:  PHIL 455.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 563 -- Philosophy of Language  (3 units)
Description:  Survey of basic issues in the philosophy of language such as: speech acts, reference, meaning, logical form. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  LING 563.
May be convened with:  PHIL 463.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 564 -- Formal Semantics  (3 units)
Description:  Introduction to model-theoretic investigations of natural language interpretation, including coordination, quantification, referential relations, tense, aspect and modality.
Identical to:  LING 564; LING is home department.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 567 -- Early Analytic Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  The 50 year rise of analytic philosophy from Frege through early Russell to Wittgenstein's Tractatus. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 467.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 570 -- Greek Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  Topics in Greek philosophy. May be selected from the pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle and post-Aristotelian philosophy. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  CLAS 570.
May be convened with:  PHIL 470.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 571A -- Rationalism and Empiricism  (3 units)
Description:  Rationalists of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, and Kant. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 471A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 571B -- Rationalism and Empiricism  (3 units)
Description:  Empiricists of the 17th and 18th centuries: Locke, Berkeley, Hume. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be convened with:  PHIL 471B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 572A -- Ancient Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  A philosophical introduction to the major works of Plato. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
Identical to:  CLAS 572A.
May be convened with:  PHIL 472A.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 572B -- Ancient Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  A philosophical introduction to the major works of Aristotle. Graduate-level requirements include an in-depth research paper on a central theme or topic of the course.
May be repeated:  for credit 1 time (maximum 2 enrollments).
Identical to:  CLAS 572B.
May be convened with:  PHIL 472B.
Usually offered:  Spring.

PHIL 593L -- Legislative Internship  (1-9 units)
Description:  Working experience at the Arizona State Legislature; responsibilities draw upon student's area of major expertise and include preparing written and oral reports, summarizing legislative proposals, and providing information to legislators and legislative committees. Participating programs include but are not limited to: architecture, economics, English, geography and regional development, history, hydrology, journalism, management, management information systems, marketing, political science, psychology, public administration, secondary education, sociology, statistics, and urban planning. Students in other programs are eligible and should consult the department head or, in the case of the James E. Roger's College of Law, the dean, for appropriate arrangements.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596A -- Ethics  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596B -- Metaphysics  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596C -- Epistemology  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596F -- Social and Political Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596G -- Philosophy of Law  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Identical to:  LAW 596G.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596H -- Philosophy of Physical Science  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Identical to:  PHYS 596H.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596K -- Philosophy of Mind  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596P -- History of Philosophy: Ancient  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596Q -- History of Philosophy: Recent  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596S -- Philosophy of Mathematics  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 596V -- Philosophy and Cognitive Science  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
May be repeated:  for credit 2 times (maximum 3 enrollments).
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring.

PHIL 596Z -- Seminar in Philosophy  (3 units)
Description:  The development and exchange of scholarly information, usually in a small group setting. The scope of work shall consist of research by course registrants, with the exchange of the results of such research through discussion, reports, and/or papers.
Usually offered:  Fall.

PHIL 599 -- Independent Study  (1-4 units)
Description:  Qualified students working on an individual basis with professors who have agreed to supervise such work. Graduate students doing independent work which cannot be classified as actual research will register for credit under course number 599, 699, or 799.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 900 -- Research  (1-4 units)
Description:  Individual research, not related to thesis or dissertation preparation, by graduate students.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 910 -- Thesis  (1-4 units)
Description:  Research for the master's thesis (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or thesis writing). Maximum total credit permitted varies with the major department.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 920 -- Dissertation  (1-9 units)
Description:  Research for the doctoral dissertation (whether library research, laboratory or field observation or research, artistic creation, or dissertation writing).
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.

PHIL 930 -- Supplementary Registration  (1-9 units)
Description:  For students who have completed all course requirements for their advanced degree programs. May be used concurrently with other enrollments to bring to total number of units to the required minimum.
May be repeated:  an unlimited number of times.
Usually offered:  Fall, Spring, Summer.


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